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bigbrod81

Saints should be proactive in finding a successor

43 posts in this topic

7 hours ago, Dru said:

Mahomes is a future star at QB in the right system where he could sit learn. He is an unbelievable talent who just needs to be able to work on the pro style aspects it takes to be successful in the NFL. I'm talking an elite top 5 QB in the league if he is given the opportunity to be brought along slowly. With that said, I don't like his chances at success if he is forced into duty too early. McShay is spot on here.

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I'm really hoping they wait till next year as that crop is much better than this years crop. I won't complain if they take one as long as it is not with the 11th pick. Next year is the year to watch though. 

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On 3/23/2017 at 10:21 AM, Bonckers said:

I'm really hoping they wait till next year as that crop is much better than this years crop. I won't complain if they take one as long as it is not with the 11th pick. Next year is the year to watch though. 

I don't think the team takes a QB at pick #11 but I honestly believe they are considering the option at #32 & #42.

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No I agree, but if they fall in love with someone like Watson, and he makes it to them at 11 with n edge rushers or DB's worthy of the 11 pick it may happen. 

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44 minutes ago, Bonckers said:

No I agree, but if they fall in love with someone like Watson, and he makes it to them at 11 with n edge rushers or DB's worthy of the 11 pick it may happen. 

I think this is similar to 2015 where the organization did their homework on both Jamesis Winston & Marcus Mariota just in case but they were targeting Bryce Petty & Garrett Grayson with them ultimately chosing Grayson. In this situation Deshaun Watson & Mitch Trubisky may end up going higher than they are willing to spend a pick on in terms of a QB with pass rusher being a high priority. I like Watson but Mahomes possesses much better value at #32 which would allow for the pick of a pass rusher at #11. Both Watson & Mahomes are physically gifted projects at the position. Because of arm strength, I give Mahomes the slight advantage. I'm really beginning to think Mahomes is the target for us at #32 if he happens to still be on the board. They will be risking him not being there 10 picks later at #42.

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That's true, the bigger plus to 32 over 42 is the 5th year option which would be huge depending on how long Brees stays or for any team that may trade for him if we choose he is not our answer. 

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I love hearing Bruce Arians or reading his interviews. He tells it like it is. I love that about the guy. I also like Pat Mahomes as a prospect but Arians just reiterates in this article what we have discussed what seems like over a hundred times which is most spread QBs aren't day one starters. I think Mahomes is a sharp kid who can benefit from sitting & learning from both Payton & Brees. The QB I believe Arians refers to in Pittsburgh is former Oregon QB Dennis Dixon.

Bruce Arians on draftable QBs: Only one guy ready to play right away

Only one of the quarterbacks eligible for the NFL draft is ready to play right away.

That's the word from Arizona Cardinals coach Bruce Arians, who addressed the draft class at the NFL's annual spring meetings.

"I’m not going to mention names," Arians said. "I think one of them is ready to start as a rookie. I think all the rest there are some really talented arms that need a year of learning how to play the position, especially at this level.”

The natural discussion that followed was to try identifying the one who can play immediately. It was all guesswork.

His one-guy assessment perfectly illustrates the challenge for the quarterback-needy Cleveland Browns as they prepare for the draft. They traded a pick a year ago that could have been Carson Wentz, and now they must choose between several players with talent, most of whom will require a 1-15 team to be patient and wait for the right time to put them on the field.

Arians is one of the true NFL "quarterback whisperers," and his resume supports it. His history is filled with quarterbacks he coached who played well. He worked with Peyton Manning. He got the best years out of Tim Couch (whom he stands by to this day, part of the reason players love him) and he got a 400-plus-yard playoff game out of Kelly Holcomb. He helped make Ben Roethlisberger what he is, had great success with Andrew Luck and has had success with Carson Palmer in Arizona.

One of the great failings of the Browns, post-1999, was that they failed to hire him as coach -- not once, but twice. (Alas we digress.)

i?img=%2Fphoto%2F2017%2F0320%2Fr192176_1

Given Arians will always answer a question honestly, it's wise to turn to him for a fair evaluation of the group that includes Mitch Trubisky of North Carolina, Deshaun Watson of Clemson, DeShone Kizer of Notre Dame, Patrick Mahomes of Texas Tech and Davis Webb of Cal.

Arians wasn't mentioning names of who can and can't play right away because he may be in the market to draft one. But he did give this individual evaluation of Trubisky: "Really talented player. The growth potential is obviously there. The question is why wasn’t all that talent starting for the last three years? That’s always bugging me. So you have to go and answer those questions with him, with his coach. But the physical talent is there.”

He also chuckled at anyone comparing Trubisky to Aaron Rodgers, a future Hall of Famer who started 25 games at Cal.

“That’s a hell of a scout; I don’t know how you can compare those two," Arians said. "When Aaron was coming out, he was in a totally different offense. I’m old enough to know when Aaron came out because I evaluated him. I think Mitch probably has a stronger arm coming out than Aaron did. But to say anybody reminds you of somebody, to me it’s just physically stature-wise or just arm-strength wise.

"I wouldn’t put that much pressure on a guy to say he’s Aaron Rodgers.”

One of the key traits Arians looks for in a quarterback is the ability to process information quickly and under duress.

"What' my protection? Am I hot? Do I have sight adjustments weak side? What's the coverage? Who do I throw to in this coverage? That all happens in 1.5 seconds," he said. "If you can't process that information, you probably can't play."

Arians also lanents the changes in the college game to spread formations and calling plays quickly from the sidelines. That offense limits the number of plays a quarterback runs and complicates the transition to the far more complex pro game.

Almost all of the draft-eligible quarterbacks come from that system, where the emphasis is on pace and calling plays quickly as opposed to pre-snap reads for coverage and protections. One element of the transition that Arians said is among the most difficult is something that from the outside seems natural: calling plays from the huddle.

[Spread quarterbacks] never got in a huddle [in college] and looked at 10 other guys who've got families to feed, and had to call a play, " Arians said. " They just look to the sideline, kick their foot and roll.

"That's the hardest thing for these kids, to come to minicamp, get in a professional huddle and try to lead these guys. You have to give them a wristband because they can't spit it out. Or you have to give them a wristband because they can't spit it out. Or you give them a wristband and then all the guys in the huddle get pissed off because he can't call the play.

"I'm not making eye contact with you and you don't have a helluva lot of confidence that I know what I'm talking about.

"We had a young guy in Pittsburgh who had all the talent in the world, but he could not call a play and he could not go to the line and use a snap count. It destroyed all of his confidence."

Browns coach Hue Jackson said that's one reason he emphasizes private workouts over pro days -- to give himself every chance possible to get as much information as he can.

"Trust me," Jackson said. "We go the extra mile with these guys. We really do. We spend a lot of time with them, and there's a lot of specific things that we ask them to do. I think if you talk to a lot of the quarterbacks, it's probably different than any other place that they've had to deal with thus far."

“Again, that’s the evaluation," Arians said. "If you’re [looking] for plug-and-play, again this draft is very small. But if you have time to bring them along, then this draft is large. But the plug-and-play guys are very small.”

He didn't mean in stature -- he meant in numbers. The challenge for the Browns is finding that one guy who is most ready to play in an NFL offense.

"Some guys might be really able to process football but can't play as well," Jackson said. "Some guys play as well and can't process football. So somewhere in between it's the right fit and the right medium for a player -- for us to consider to be a quarterback on our football team."

http://www.espn.com/blog/cleveland-browns/post/_/id/21862/bruce-arians-on-draftable-qbs-only-one-guy-ready-to-play-right-away

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very nice read, I would be curious who he is referencing. Is it the QB from Pitt Peterman? Is it Josh Dobbs? I honestly don't know which offense either runs. I know it's not Trubiskuy, Kizer, Watson, Weeb, or Mahomes. All ran a spread offense, and would not be able to run a a huddle or under center offense come week 1. 

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Nice article from PFT that makes sense as to why colleges are going to the spread. I personally think teams that run the pro style offense have one or two things going for them. number 1 they dominate the choice of QB's, and or two they have players who are dedicated to learn the system either on their own studying the playbook or picking other players brains. JMO. The one guy Ic an talk to is Jameis Winston. I stayed late at two FSU games with a friend of mine who collects autographs. When a red shirt sophmore stays in the locker room after the head coach. Mind you we waited till 1 am and got Jimbo Fisher Autographs that tells you the dedication. I don't know what he was doing, but we had all exits covered. there was 6 of us. He did not leave when we left at 1 am. Almost every other player and coach left but him. He was not injured either to our knowledge and we kept asking people if he was still there and they said yes he was. 

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/04/01/holgorsen-explains-challenges-of-developing-college-quarterbacks/

 

Holgorsen explains challenges of developing college quarterbacks

Posted by Mike Florio on April 1, 2017, 9:25 AM EDT
491472790-e1491053109765.jpg?w=226Getty Images

The most important position in the NFL also has become the toughest to properly evaluate. Friday’s PFT Live included a visit with one of the men who develop quarterbacks at the college level for consideration and employment by pro football teams.

West Virginia coach Dana Holgorsen explained the challenges of developing quarterbacks, given the time limitations that apply to student-athletes.

“It’s tough,” Holgorsen said. “I’ve had that question a lot from a lot of the NFL guys. ‘Why do keep things this simple? Why is the spread offense so simple? Why don’t you go under center? Why don’t you use more tight ends? Why don’t you use more fullbacks?’

“You’ve only got 20 hours a week with these guys, plus you’re limited with your scholarship numbers too. So we choose just to try to get good at something. You don’t have very much time where you can work with these guys. They’ve got to go to class, they’ve got to have a social life. We’re limited with the amount of hours that we have with them so you’ve just got to be careful on how much you put on them.”

That’s why, as Bruce Arians told PFT Live in Phoenix, college coaches look for quarterbacks who can “out-athlete” defenses. At the next level — as players like Robert Griffin III have discovered — that simply doesn’t work.

Which makes it only more difficult to figure out which of the college quarterbacks can and will become good (and hopefully great) NFL quarterbacks.

 

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What we learned: Saints, Cardinals among draft fits for Mahomes

It's pro-day season, and College Football 24/7 is your one-stop shop for information and analysis on the on-campus workouts that allow draft prospects to make an up-close impression on NFL club personnel. Here's a look at the key takeaways from Friday's action.

One thing to keep in mind: Pro-day testing results tend to be more favorable for prospects than NFL Scouting Combine results.

Texas Tech: Mahomes would fit nicely in New Orleans, or Arizona

 

Big draw: QB Patrick Mahomes
Attendance: Reps from 28 NFL teams attended the Red Raiders workout, per the school, including Giants coach Ben McAdoo, 49ers GM John Lynch and Seahawks GM John Schneider. Cowboys QB coach Wade Wilson was on hand as well.
The skinny: After Mahomes' 68-throw session, NFL Network draft expert Mike Mayock, who attended the workout, said the New Orleans Saints and Arizona Cardinals would be two strong fits for the former Red Raiders star. Why? Because because it would afford him a short-term understudy role.

"Best-case scenario is he plays behind a quality starter for a year or two, a veteran. New Orleans, Arizona, one of those situations," Mayock said.

Might the two clubs see things the same way? Both traveled to Lubbock for a private workout with Mahomes earlier this month, and the Saints remarked to Mahomes about his impressive progress afterward. As for Mahomes' workout Friday, Mayock saw both positives and negatives.

"The big-arm throws that most quarterbacks don't like to make: 20-yard comeback, cover-2, throw in between the corner and the safety -- he threw both of those beautifully," Mayock said. "The deep, outbreaking routes where you really got to drive it, he was outstanding. Now, some of the throws he struggled with, I thought he was more concerned about his new footwork and mechanics and forgot to drive the football."

Mahomes was the unquestioned main attraction, as Texas Tech's other pro-day participants are considered fringe prospects. He went through passing drills only and stood on his combine testing. He met with McAdoo on Thursday.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000795872/article/what-we-learned-saints-cardinals-among-draft-fits-for-mahomes

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I honestly would not mind at 32 or 42, but if they pick at 11 it will not be a good year for us again. Honestly not sure he makes it past the Texans or the Chiefs to make it to 32 or 42.

Edited by Bonckers
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Don't know much about the guy but if he is a smart as it seems, and he has a connection to Peyton for advice. Going to do some research on Dobbs. He could be one of the steals of the draft. All I know is I do not want Kaaya!

 

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/04/04/josh-dobbs-i-majored-in-aerospace-engineering-i-can-learn-a-playbook/

 

Josh Dobbs: I majored in aerospace engineering, I can learn a playbook

Posted by Michael David Smith on April 4, 2017, 12:13 PM EDT
611852638-e1491321685145.jpg?w=209Getty Images

Former Tennessee quarterback Joshua Dobbs may be the smartest player in this year’s draft class, and he’s not afraid to let NFL teams know just how smart he is.

According to Emily Kaplan of TheMMQB.com, Dobbs, an aerospace engineering major in college, found it a little ridiculous when some coaches asked him at the Scouting Combine if he thought he could handle an NFL playbook.

“My senior year I was taking astronautics, propulsion and an aerodynamics class . . . all on the same day,” Dobbs said. “At the same time as football season when I was leading an SEC team. I think I can handle it.”

Dobbs also has a good relationship with one of the smartest quarterbacks ever to play the game, fellow Tennessee alum Peyton Manning, who gave Dobbs some tips that Manning would only pass along to someone at his alma mater.

“I would text Peyton throughout his career, and he would respond on a constant basis,” Dobbs said. “I know it’s rare, and I learned how to take advantage of the connection. But you can’t give away too many of his secrets, or you might not have that relationship.”

Keeping Manning’s secrets close to the vest is one sign of Dobbs’ intelligence, but far from the only one.

 

 

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23 hours ago, Bonckers said:

Don't know much about the guy but if he is a smart as it seems, and he has a connection to Peyton for advice. Going to do some research on Dobbs. He could be one of the steals of the draft. All I know is I do not want Kaaya!

 

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2017/04/04/josh-dobbs-i-majored-in-aerospace-engineering-i-can-learn-a-playbook/

 

Josh Dobbs: I majored in aerospace engineering, I can learn a playbook

Posted by Michael David Smith on April 4, 2017, 12:13 PM EDT
611852638-e1491321685145.jpg?w=209Getty Images

Former Tennessee quarterback Joshua Dobbs may be the smartest player in this year’s draft class, and he’s not afraid to let NFL teams know just how smart he is.

According to Emily Kaplan of TheMMQB.com, Dobbs, an aerospace engineering major in college, found it a little ridiculous when some coaches asked him at the Scouting Combine if he thought he could handle an NFL playbook.

“My senior year I was taking astronautics, propulsion and an aerodynamics class . . . all on the same day,” Dobbs said. “At the same time as football season when I was leading an SEC team. I think I can handle it.”

Dobbs also has a good relationship with one of the smartest quarterbacks ever to play the game, fellow Tennessee alum Peyton Manning, who gave Dobbs some tips that Manning would only pass along to someone at his alma mater.

“I would text Peyton throughout his career, and he would respond on a constant basis,” Dobbs said. “I know it’s rare, and I learned how to take advantage of the connection. But you can’t give away too many of his secrets, or you might not have that relationship.”

Keeping Manning’s secrets close to the vest is one sign of Dobbs’ intelligence, but far from the only one.

 

 

I know a lot about Dobbs. As you can tell from the article he is an intelligent young man. He is also of high character with a solid work ethic. From a skill set perspective, he is big & mobile. His size allows him to break tackles when he escapes the pocket. His arm strength is above average. At times he is inaccurate with his throws which could be a mechanics issue. I also believe that the Tennessee WRs in their last few recruiting classes have been overrated or under developed. Dobbs hadn't really had much help at WR. Not the type of WR talent you come to expect at a program like Tennessee. He is also coming from a spread offense but like Dobbs says, he learned aerospace engineering, he should be able learn a playbook. He should also be able to decipher information very quickly.  He is a project. He may not be as physically gifted as Pat Mahomes but again, in the right environment, Dobbs could possibly blossom.

Bonckers likes this

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I love Lattimore. We don't make the playoffs the last 2 seasons without him but franchise QBs are extremely rare. Mahomes is more than a franchise QB though. He is a talent we may never see at QB again in our lifetime. Damn you Andy Reid!!!!

Slidell Saint, Bonckers and louder like this

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Very True Brod, but at some point, they are going to find his weakness just like Favre had one and so does Brady, Brees, and Manning. The last three didn't play well under pressure. I think we will look hard for one this offseason or we sign Keenum after this year when Brees retires. 

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